E-bikes can prove costly when it comes to insurance claims

Although both motorists and cyclists don't seem to crazy about them, electronic bicycles (e-bikes) are flying off the shelves these days. They're cheap to buy, cheap to run and don't leave much of a carbon footprint. They are, however, subject to provincial traffic laws; that is, they can ride in traffic with motor vehicles, like scooters, and their operators mustn’t drive recklessly or under the influence of alcohol. Here's a good summary of the existing rules. More importantly, they also don't need a license or insurance, according to a recent Ontario Court of Justice ruling. But taking that latter option at face value might be shortsighted, warns My Insurance Shopper. Like any motorized vehicle, there is a liability risk attached with owning this type of vehicle. If you're an owner of this type of motorized vehicle you need to know that you may have no liability coverage if you get into an accident, and you could find yourself without coverage if you cause property damage or worse, injure another person. Normal car insurance contains liability coverage but homeowners policies are structured a bit differently and generally exclude motorized vehicles except for lawn mowers, other gardening equipment, snow blowers, wheelchairs and motorized golf carts on the golf premises. But a good number of policies exclude e-bikes as well. No insurance required doesn't mean you're not at risk. It’s important to educate yourself on your policy and exercise caution when purchasing and using these types of vehicles, MIS warns. Do you drive an e-bike? Do you worry about what might happen in an

Man discovers dead body in newly purchased France apartment

It's a surprise that we hope never happens to us. The new owner of an apartment walked in to find the hanged body of the previous owner behind the front door when the locksmith opened up his newly purchased property. While it's odd that the body wasn't found earlier, you think the buyer would have visited the property before signing any papers, apparently the body was undisturbed for eight years, according to a local France newspaper. Thomas Ngin, a security guard, had been fired from his previous job, dealing with court proceedings with his employer in legal court and facing debt issues. The bank seized his property and sold it at an auction where it was bought for 415,000 euros (about $598,889) in early October. It explains why the owner never saw the property in advance, but he's likely regretting that decision now. Meanwhile, police are conducting an autopsy to determine a specific date of death. As for the unfortunate new owner, his properly value will likely drop since no one wants to live in a house that someone died in. There's a negative stigma that you just can't shake off and you're better off demolishing and rebuilding the place. You would think that disclosing a death in the property would be required, but in provinces other than Quebec, this isn't the case. While real estate agents and sellers don't have to tell a potential buyer this information, Ontario real estate agents are required to “discover and verify the pertinent facts relating to the property and the transaction” as a part of the rules by the Real Estate Council of Ontario, Toronto Star. It likely isn't their fault that a death happened in their homes, but it seems wrong that they wouldn't let potential buyers know all the information about a place. There are a few court cases where a buyer purchased the property and discovered the house's history later, neighbors do talk. If you want to avoid all this trouble, there's a simple solution: do a quick Internet search before purchasing the property. You'll likely conduct one to figure out about the crime rate or education in the area and this should be an extra precaution you should take to ensure your future property's value. Once you've signed the dotted line, the place becomes yours and it's your problem to deal with. In the United States, DiedInHouse.com will tell you who died in your home, if anyone, for $11.99 U.S. While this service isn't available in Canada, hopefully it'll become available soon or real estate agents and sellers will be required to disclose this information. Do you think sellers should be required to disclose a death that happened on the