15 BEST CANADIAN PERSONAL FINANCE BLOGGERS

What I do know is there are a lot of people who love talking about all things money-related, including how they’re going after their financial goals. Whether they’re paying down a mountain of debt, saving for a house, travelling on a budget, planning early retirement, or just sharing everything they know about credit cards, investing, taxes, you name it. Whatever you need to know about, there are people out there who share their stories and can inspire you throughout your own journey.

If you need a little inspiration, here are 15 best Canadian personal finance bloggers.

1

Boomer and Echo 

Written by a mother and son duo from Southern Alberta, Boomer (Marie) and Echo (Robb) offers the most unique combination of authors in the personal finance space. While Marie shares her stories about once struggling to raise a family and retiring with a decent income so she can do all she’s dreamt about, Robb discusses building his portfolio and working towards early retirement. He also knows a thing or two about the best credit cards in Canada!

2

Canadian Couch Potato 

Launched in 2010, the Canadian Couch Potato teaches readers about investing using index mutual funds and exchange-traded funds (ETFs). The “Couch Potato” strategy, as it’s now known, is growing in popularity as more people become disillusioned with overpriced, actively managed mutual funds and stock-picking strategies that try to beat the market. The blog’s author, Dan Bortolotti, is an investment advisor in Toronto, as well as a freelance writer.

3

Gail Vaz-Oxlade 

Gail Vaz-Oxlade likely needs no introduction. She’s a financial writer, author of more than a dozen personal finance books, host of a number of television shows, including ‘Til Debt Do Us Part, Princess and Money Moron, and has been helping people with money for more than 20 years. On her personal blog, Gail shares advice on how to get out of debt, how to budget, how to save… and how to cook, relax and enjoy life, too!

4

Give Me Back My Five Bucks 

In 2007, Krystal Yee found herself up against $20,000 of consumer and student debt. In deciding to get serious about her financial situation, she started a blog to document her debt repayment journey. Krystal wiped out her debt in just 12 months, then moved on to talk about building up savings, buying her first home in Greater Vancouver, saving for retirement, and travelling (and even living) abroad. She was also a contributor to the Toronto Star’s Moneyville site for many years.

5

Million Dollar Journey 

Frugal Trader, as he’s known to readers, began investing in mutual funds when he was just 16 years old, and got more serious about real estate and the stock market when he graduated from university. Over the years, he’s built an equity portfolio that has continued to grow. When he started the blog in 2006, he had a net worth of $200,000 and was determined to reach $1 million by the end of 2014; he achieved that goal six months early, in June. FT lives in Eastern Canada with his wife.

6

Mo’ Money Mo’ Houses 

While she’s not a debt blogger (and should be proud of that fact!), Jessica Moorhouse has been obsessed with personal finance for years. Born and raised in Vancouver, she now lives in Toronto with her husband, where she works as a digital marketing coordinator. For the past three years, she’s been writing about everything from finishing school, changing careers, getting married, budgeting as a couple, moving across the country… and possibly buying a house in Toronto!

7

Money After Graduation 

After graduating from the University of Alberta with a BSc., Bridget Casey realized she had over $21,000 of student loan debt – and wanted it gone. She started her career and began putting large lump sums down on it, while building her investment portfolio and saving for retirement. She paid off her debt in less than 2 years, which she wrote about on her blog. Bridget is now completing her MBA at the University of Calgary, and wants to help her readers build happy (and wealthy) lives.

8

Money We Have 

Barry Choi is one of the newer personal finance bloggers on the scene, but has a wealth of knowledge to share. With lots of travelling under his belt, he’s a self-described budget travel expert, and provides practical money saving tips to help you take your next dream vacation. When he’s not writing about that, or updating readers on how his investments are performing, Barry works at a TV newsroom in Toronto (where he lives with his wife).

9

My Alternate Life 

Jordann did all the things a millennial is told to do: go to school, get good grades and get a degree. After that, she would get a good job, make decent money, and go on to tackle all of life’s other milestones… right? Not when you have $38,000 of debt to payoff first. Since February 2012, she’s cut back on spending and documented her debt repayment journey (took less than 2 years), as well as updated readers on her savings goals and overall net worth. She also recently moved to Halifax.

10

My Own Advisor 

Mark Seed, of Ottawa, started investing when he was in his early 20s, after reading The Wealthy Barber. While he was first putting his money into mutual funds, and paying high management expense ratios (MERs), he eventually learned his lesson and started to pay closer attention to where, how and when he should invest. My Own Advisor is a personal finance and investing blog dedicated to chronicling his journey to financial independence.

11

Plunged in Debt 

While overspending is the cause of debt for many, that wasn’t the case for Catherine and her husband. No, her student loan debt is the reason they’re in deep – and the couple in Atlantic Canada is currently trying to pay off $70,000 in just 36 months. Catherine’s motivation came when she went on maternity leave and lost a substantial amount of monthly income, but she and her husband are now determined to reach debt zero and experience life on the other side.

12

Squawkfox 

If you describe yourself as “frugal” – or even remotely aspire to be so – Kerry Taylor can help you come up with a few ways to cut back. What started as a newsletter for friends in 2008 quickly turned into a fun blog with a strong focus on consumer smarts. She uses (mostly real) math and “science” to prove when something being sold to us is a bad deal, and the results are often humorous (and include great pictures to boot). Kerry lives in Toronto with her husband and their daughter.

13

The Blunt Bean Counter

Mark is a Chartered Professional Accountant and a partner with a National Accounting Firm in Toronto. Simply put, he knows money (especially income taxes) and is also fascinated by the psychology of it all. While his posts are targeted to high net worth individuals and owners of private corporations, there’s something on The Blunt Bean Counter for everyone. Just be warned that his opinions are, in fact, very blunt!

14

Young and Thrifty 

What started as an idea to create a resource that would help university students better understand personal finance turned into a mission… and a much bigger adventure! Kyle and Justin, two guys from Manitoba, first launched their own site, then took over Young and Thrifty from its original author. On the site, you’ll find posts about everything young adults need to know about, beyond how to pay off student loan debt (think: mortgages, investing, asset allocation and more).

15

Blonde on a Budget

That’s me! Well, that’s me when I’m not at work. I started my blog in 2011, when I realized I was maxed out with nearly $30,000 of debt. Blonde on a Budget first served as a place where I could stay accountable and document my progress. I paid off my debt in two years, then moved on to talk about savings, travelling and minimalism… and I’m currently in the middle of a yearlong shopping ban, which might inspire you to cut back in 2015!

What I do know is there are a lot of people who love talking about all things money-related, including how they’re going after their financial goals. Whether they’re paying down a mountain of debt, saving for a house, travelling on a budget, planning early retirement, or just sharing everything they know about credit cards, investing, taxes, you name it. Whatever you need to know about, there are people out there who share their stories and can inspire you throughout your own journey.…

How to Send Money From Canada to Florida

If you have moved to Florida for the summer or longer and are looking to transfer money from Canada to Florida this article is here to help.

The simple answer is that online Western Union Money Transfer is the cheapest and easiest but this article will give you other options as well!

The Western Union Company is an American financial services and communications company. Its North American headquarters is in Meridian, Colorado, though the postal designation of nearby Englewood is used in its mailing address. Up until it discontinued the service in 2006, Western Union was the best-known U.S. company in the business of exchanging telegrams.

Western Union has several divisions, with products such as person-to-person money transfer, money orders, business payments and commercial services. They offered standard “Cablegrams”, as well as more cheerful products such as Candygrams, Dollygrams, and Melodygrams.…

Best Faxless Payday Loans Canada

While most companies require that you send in proof of income etc there are some same day faxless payday loan companies which do not require any information beyond what you fill out online.

A payday loan (also called a payday advance, salary loan, payroll loan, small dollar loan, short term, or cash advance loan) is a small, short-term unsecured loan, "regardless of whether repayment of loans is linked to a borrower's payday." The loans are also sometimes referred to as "cash advances," though that term can also refer to cash provided against a prearranged line of credit such as a credit card. Payday advance loans rely on the consumer having previous payroll and employment records. Legislation regarding payday loans varies widely between different countries and, within the USA, between different states.

To prevent usury (unreasonable and excessive rates of interest), some jurisdictions limit the annual percentage rate (APR) that any lender, including payday lenders, can charge. Some jurisdictions outlaw payday lending entirely, and some have very few restrictions on payday lenders. In the United States, the rates of these loans were formerly restricted in most states by the Uniform Small Loan Laws (USLL), with 36%-40% APR generally the norm.

There are many different ways to calculate annual percentage rate of a loan. Depending on which method is used, the rate calculated may differ dramatically. E.g., for a $15 charge on a $100 14-day payday loan, it could be (from the borrower's perspective) anywhere from 391% to 3733%.

Although some have noted that these loans appear to carry substantial risk to the lender, it has recently been shown that these loans carry no more long term risk for the lender than other forms of credit. These studies seem to be confirmed by the SEC 10-K filings of at least one lender, who notes a charge-off rate of 3.2%.

DollarsDirect.ca Review

dollars-direct-review

Requirements:

  • Have an active bank account
  • Be at least 18 years of age
  • Have been employed with the same company long enough to have received at least one payslip
  • Be a resident of Alberta, Ontario, Saskatchewan or BC

How Much Money Can I Receive?

  • $500 for new customers
  • $1,500 repeat customers

New customers may qualify for up to $500. Your loan amount is determined by the information you provide in your application, including your income, and by your credit history and their qualification criteria. Repeat customers can receive up to $1,500.

How Fast Do I Get The Money?

  • Same Day (if you apply before 1PM EST Monday - Friday)

If you apply on Saturday or Sunday, you may receive your funds as early as Monday. If Monday is a holiday, you’ll receive your funds as early as Wednesday. If you apply on a holiday, you may receive your funds as early as the business day after the holiday. The exact time of funding depends in part on when your bank posts direct deposits to your bank account. If you expect loan funds on a certain day, but do not see them in your bank account, please call their Customer Service team toll-free at 1-866-770-7165.

Your due date will normally be on your next payday that is between eight and 40 days away from the date your loan funds are deposited into your bank account. If your application is submitted by 1 PM ET Monday through Friday, your funds may be deposited the same day.

What is the Fee for my Payday Loan?

  • $21 for every $100 (Ontario)
  • $23 (BC, Saskatchewan, Alberta)

If you are a resident of Ontario, you will be charged a fee of $21 for every $100 borrowed; if you are a resident of either British Columbia, Saskatchewan or Alberta , you will be charged a fee of $23 for every $100 borrowed. If you have a discount code, you must provide it when you fill out your application to receive the applicable discount on the loan fee.

Will I Need To Send a Fax?

  • Often NO Fax Is Required!

While most companies require that you send in proof of income etc there are some same day faxless payday loan companies which do not require any information beyond what you fill out online.

A payday loan (also called a payday advance, salary loan, payroll loan, small dollar loan, short term, or cash advance loan) is a small, short-term unsecured loan, “regardless of whether repayment of loans is linked to a borrower’s payday.” The loans are also sometimes referred to as “cash advances,” though that term can also refer to cash provided against a prearranged line of credit such as a credit card. Payday advance loans rely on the consumer having previous payroll and employment records. Legislation regarding payday loans varies widely between different countries and, within the USA, between different states.

To prevent usury (unreasonable and excessive rates of interest), some jurisdictions limit the annual percentage rate (APR) that any lender, including payday lenders, can charge. Some jurisdictions outlaw payday lending entirely, and some have very few restrictions on payday lenders. In the United States, the rates of these loans were formerly restricted in most states by the Uniform Small Loan Laws (USLL), with 36%-40% APR generally the norm.

Personal finance and accounting

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3 Fastest Small Business Loan Companies in Canada

Are you running a small business and need money now! 

Banks take too long and turn you down, payday loans are too expensive and gambling for payroll doesn't always work out as well as it did for Fred Smith from FedEx.

Luckily there are some companies that now provide opportunities for Canadian small businesses to get access to fast cash to cover expenses.

Below is a review of the opportunities for Canadian small businesses to take out fast loans or merchant cash advances.

Merchant Advance

Best for 6+ month old businesses who don't need the $ today!

Borrow $1,000-$350,000

Receive Funds in 1-2 days

  • Great Interest Rates
  • Repayment Options
  • Must Be in Business 6 Months
  • %5k/month minimum

Fast Cap 

Best for businesses who need money FAST!

Borrow $500-$100,000

Receive Funds in 24hrs!

  • 99.8% Approval Rate
  • No Credit Check
  • Repayment terms are fixed
  • $100k limit

Dollars Direct

Best for VERY small businesses with low monthly volume

Borrow $100-$1,500

Receive Funds in 24hrs!

  • Fast Approval
  • Simple Application
  • Expensive
  • $1,500 limit

10 Reasons to Borrow Money as a Small Business...

  • Expansion
  • Payrool
  • Equipment
  • Cash Flow
  • Inventory
  • Renovations
  • Buying out a Partner
  • Paying Bills
  • Tax Payments
  • Other Emergencies

​Below are reviews of the best options to get a small business loan quickly in Canada...

FAST CAP FINANCIAL REVIEW

fastcap-financial-review

Using their secure & easy automated system, the advance is paid back automatically on a daily basis through a portion of your future Visa, Mastercard & Debit sales. The total advance consists of the funded amount, plus a fee that is determined through their application process. Unlike a bank loan, other merchant cash advance companies, there is NO credit check, NO accruing interest, NO timeframe, NO collateral & NO fixed payments.

their Program is ideal for ANY Canadian business, regardless how long you have been in business, who your processor is, your industry or processing volume. We can provide a quick infusion of cash for any and all types of business needs.

FastCap Financial offers quick injections of cash into your business. By quick, we mean the same day! Their approval process is fast, simple and transparent and we approve every qualified and completed application for an advance, guaranteed.

Requirements:

  • Must have a registered Canadian Business in Business 1 Month
  • You Must Have a Physical Business Location
  • You Must Currently Accept Debit or Credit Cards ($1k/month)

How Much Money Can I Receive?

  • $1000 to $1,000,000

Fast Cap Financial will provide you with funds based on your sales volume.

They have a handy calculator on their homepage to help determine how much you can borrow.​

How Fast Do I Get The Money?

  • 24hrs!

Fast! their application process is simple and we can have funds in your account in 24 hours.

What is the Fee for my Loan?

  • No Charges or Fees for the Loan!
  • Interest rate charged and no timeframe

Applying, getting funding options and submitting an agreement is absolutely free, there are no fees charged during the application process. There is interest and no timeframe. We purchase future receivables at a discount. There is a onetime fee, the size of the fee for your merchant cash advance depends on a number of factors including the size of the advance, the industry you are in, the level of seasonality in your business, and the size of your average sale, among other things. Find out exactly what you qualify today! Just fill out their online application form and a FastCap Funding specialist will contact you

Will I Need To Send a Fax?

  • NO Fax Is Required!

Merchant Advance Capital Review

dollars-direct-review

Their merchant advance program takes your future cash flows and turns them into immediate cash that you can use for your business right away. The balance is paid off automatically through a portion of future debit/credit card sales, or through an automatic fixed daily payment in the event that your business does not accept much debit/credit.

The balance consists of the funded amount, plus a fee that is determined through their application process. Their process is simple and transparent

Requirements:

  • Business with a physical location
  • Been in business 6 months & have 6 month lease
  • $5k/month in debit/credit card sales

Their merchant advance program takes your future cash flows and turns them into immediate cash that you can use for your business right away. The balance is paid off automatically through a portion of future debit/credit card sales, or through an automatic fixed daily payment in the event that your business does not accept much debit/credit.

How Much Money Can I Receive?

  • $350k per location!

Merchant Advance can provide up to $350k per location!

How Fast Do I Get The Money?

  • 1-2 business days

They can provide funding for your business in as little as 1-2 business days upon receiving your completed application forms and documents

What is the Fee for my Loan?

  • No Charges for the Loan!
  • Daily interest rate charged based on your application

A merchant cash advance manager will contact you to provide more details once you apply.

By analyzing your historical debit/credit card sales volumes we establish targets for the length of your merchant cash advance program. A program can be designed to last anywhere from 3-10 months and the amount of cash that we can advance you depends on the length of the program. However, the length of time it actually takes for us to get paid back depends on how well your business does (we don’t get paid until you get paid!). Apply now and a Merchant Advance Capital Relationship Manager will contact you to discuss which options best suit your needs.​

Will I Need To Send a Fax?

  • NO Fax Is Required!

DollarsDirect.ca Review

dollars-direct-review

Requirements:

  • Have an active bank account
  • Be at least 18 years of age
  • Have been employed with the same company long enough to have received at least one payslip
  • Be a resident of Alberta, Ontario, Saskatchewan or BC

How Much Money Can I Receive?

  • $500 for new customers
  • $1,500 repeat customers

New customers may qualify for up to $500. Your loan amount is determined by the information you provide in your application, including your income, and by your credit history and their qualification criteria. Repeat customers can receive up to $1,500.

How Fast Do I Get The Money?

  • Same Day (if you apply before 1PM EST Monday - Friday)

If you apply on Saturday or Sunday, you may receive your funds as early as Monday. If Monday is a holiday, you’ll receive your funds as early as Wednesday. If you apply on a holiday, you may receive your funds as early as the business day after the holiday. The exact time of funding depends in part on when your bank posts direct deposits to your bank account. If you expect loan funds on a certain day, but do not see them in your bank account, please call their Customer Service team toll-free at 1-866-770-7165.

Your due date will normally be on your next payday that is between eight and 40 days away from the date your loan funds are deposited into your bank account. If your application is submitted by 1 PM ET Monday through Friday, your funds may be deposited the same day.

What is the Fee for my Payday Loan?

  • $21 for every $100 (Ontario)
  • $23 (BC, Saskatchewan, Alberta)

If you are a resident of Ontario, you will be charged a fee of $21 for every $100 borrowed; if you are a resident of either British Columbia, Saskatchewan or Alberta , you will be charged a fee of $23 for every $100 borrowed. If you have a discount code, you must provide it when you fill out your application to receive the applicable discount on the loan fee.

Will I Need To Send a Fax?

  • Often NO Fax Is Required!

Are you running a small business and need money now!

Banks take too long and turn you down, payday loans are too expensive and gambling for payroll doesn’t always work out as well as it did for Fred Smith from FedEx.

Luckily there are some companies that now provide opportunities for Canadian small businesses to get access to fast cash to cover expenses.

Below is a review of the opportunities for Canadian small businesses to take out fast loans or merchant cash advances.…

New Zealand moves to three days a week mail service

Times are changing with postal services around the world thanks to people’s reliance on smart phones and email.

New Zealand recently agreed to cut its mail delivery to three days a week in urban areas and five days a week in rural areas, since they’re more reliant on mail, by 2015. Normally, mail is delivered six days a week.

The New Zealand Post fought for the change since it currently barely breaks even. If the normal delivery schedule continue, the service would be put it in the red, according to the Telegraph.

During the last 10 years, the amount of mail sent has dropped by a quarter and it’s expected to continue rapidly dropping. The nation continues to lose another eight per cent each year, the communications minister told the Telegraph.

Anyone looking for daily mail deliveries can sign up for a premium courier-type service, but it will be interesting to see how businesses and newspapers adjust to this change.

Meanwhile, Canada Post looks like it is in a boat that is steadily sinking. The Crown Corporation saw a $104-million loss in Q2 of this year and it expects a huge loss in 2013. As if that was not enough, they are expected to face a yearly loss of $1 billion by 2020, according to a report produced by the Conference Board of Canada.

It’s important to point out that its letter delivery dropped by 51 million pieces since Q2 of 2012, while parcel packages have grown thanks to more online shopping. Unfortunately, the letters, otherwise known as transaction mail, which includes bills and statements, account for 50 percent of the company’s revenue. Tough times are ahead, especially with companies pushing paperless billing.

At least there is some hope for Canada Post’s parcel delivery. Canada Post recently announced a partnership with Walmart, Best Buy and Indigo to try same-day delivery. Anyone who orders items by midday can expect to receive it in the evening. A pilot program is being tested in Toronto.

Some of the cost-cutting options floated around include getting rid of door-to-door delivery mail in urban areas, which is available to one-third of Canadians, which could cut the bleeding by about half, the Conference Board told the CBC. Canada Post is also looking into consolidating mail processing, implementing new technology for sorting and shortening hours at slower retail locations.

While residential owners might not mind a shift in the number of deliveries a week, apparently it will be a bigger issue for small business owners who are more reliant on the regular postal service.

But let’s face it, drops in mail service are being felt around the world. The U.S. Postal Service planned to cut Saturday mail service, but it faced resistance, while Britain recently privatized its mail service, Royal Mail. Who knows if other countries’ mail services will follow New Zealand’s route.

Would you mindless frequent mail service?

E-bikes can prove costly when it comes to insurance claims

Although both motorists and cyclists don’t seem to crazy about them, electronic bicycles (e-bikes) are flying off the shelves these days. They’re cheap to buy, cheap to run and don’t leave much of a carbon footprint.

They are, however, subject to provincial traffic laws; that is, they can ride in traffic with motor vehicles, like scooters, and their operators mustn’t drive recklessly or under the influence of alcohol. Here’s a good summary of the existing rules.

More importantly, they also don’t need a license or insurance, according to a recent Ontario Court of Justice ruling. But taking that latter option at face value might be shortsighted, warns My Insurance Shopper.

“Like any motorized vehicle, there is a liability risk attached with owning this type of vehicle. If you’re an owner of this type of motorized vehicle you need to know that you may have no liability coverage if you get into an accident, and you could find yourself without coverage if you cause property damage or worse, injure another person.”

Normal car insurance contains liability coverage but homeowners policies are structured a bit differently and generally exclude motorized vehicles except for lawn mowers, other gardening equipment, snow blowers, wheelchairs and motorized golf carts on the golf premises.

But a good number of policies exclude e-bikes as well.

No insurance required doesn’t mean you’re not at risk. It’s important to educate yourself on your policy and exercise caution when purchasing and using these types of vehicles, MIS warns.

Do you drive an e-bike? Do you worry about what might happen in an accident?

Canada’s pension system is simply not doing the job, authors say

Political issues deemed too important or sensitive to be tampered with are often referred to as the ‘third rail’ after the electrically-charged third rail in subway systems … like Canada’s pension system, for instance.

“Many Canadians will be surprised by how much they will need to save to fund their desired income in retirement and that their income is going to plummet,” says Jim Leech, co-author of The Third Rail: Confronting our Pension Failures.

“It’s clear that existing pension structures are not allowing people to reach their saving goals. Political leadership is urgently required to bring a more flexible approach to retirement planning, one that can withstand the pressures of more retirees and longer life expectancy.”

The easiest and most efficient way to close this shortfall is to enhance the Canada Pension Plan, he maintains. But that’s not likely to happen anytime soon since most workers and their employers are simply too short sighted.

As employers and employees each contribute roughly 5% of their pay straight into the CPP, an increase in the rate would mean that employees would have to get a raise larger than the CPP hike to ensure their take-home doesn’t drop. They would, however, see an offset with a larger CPP pension down the road.

Many critics have voiced strong opposition to any boost in CPP contributions, however, labelling it another job-killing payroll tax on businesses. Nonetheless, Ontario is considering launching its own pension plan if it cannot obtain reforms to CPP.

Leech and co-author Jacquie McNish would also like to see some action taken to stem the decline of defined benefit plans — the least expensive way to provide a pension to workers, they argue.

The authors cite Rhode Island and New Brunswick as examples of jurisdictions that have taken drastic measures to address pension shortfalls, including major cuts to municipal jobs and services. But both are cautionary tales.

And they will remain so as long as a government continues to ignore the root cause of the retirement meltdown, they maintain.

Record numbers of workers are retiring and living longer than anyone expected; pension funds have not built in sufficient surpluses to cope with market and demographic stresses, and employers are unwilling to shoulder these steadily increasing costs.

Failure to address these issues immediately will soon lead to disaster, the authors predict.

Would you like to set more money aside using the CPP? If you’re lucky enough to have one, are you concerned about the stability of the plan you’re involved with?

That’s why it’s so tough to save money!

Budgeting is tough, particularly when you’re trying to actually set some money aside for the future.

Like losing weight or battling any addiction, saving money resides in the realm of behaviour that sometimes seems immune to rational solutions, says one ex-banker turned blogger. But it’s often tough to get out of the gate without some help.

“My guess is that the best person to help you figure out how to save money is somebody who has suffered from living beyond their means in the past, and who has developed effective strategies for overcoming this problem,” he says.

But if that person isn’t readily available to you, you still need to figure out what’s holding you back. That means tricking that rational mind and helping it get with the programme, he suggests, including developing a better sense of just what’s going on upstairs.

Here are a few things to consider:

1. The Hawthorne effect: Just as scientists acknowledge that observing something inevitably alters it, the longer and more closely you begin to observe your spending patterns, the more likely you are to shift them in a more positive direction. That skew that frustrates scientists will nudge you to better choices.

2. Radical transparency: Everybody like a pat on the back but not when it comes to dealing with money troubles. Don’t flash the cash and pretend that everything is ok. If you can steer your mind away from keeping your spending patterns secret, you may be able to tap into positive peer pressure from partners or friends. This could boost your determination when it comes to making difficult money-saving decisions.

3. Out of sight, out of mind: If you don’t have money in your hand, or don’t spend a lot of time checking your bank balance, it’s much easier to forget that you ever had the money in the first place. Which, naturally, means you’re more likely to save rather than spend.

Each of these techniques operates on the subconscious in a way that doesn’t make perfect sense. But because that’s often where the problem lies in saving money so perhaps the solution resides there as well.

Do you find it tough to save? How have you managed to break those poor spending habits?

Man discovers dead body in newly purchased France apartment

It’s a surprise that we hope never happens to us.

The new owner of an apartment walked in to find the hanged body of the previous owner behind the front door when the locksmith opened up his newly purchased property. While it’s odd that the body wasn’t found earlier, you think the buyer would have visited the property before signing any papers, apparently the body was undisturbed for eight years, according to a local France newspaper.

Thomas Ngin, a security guard, had been fired from his previous job, dealing with court proceedings with his employer in legal court and facing debt issues.

The bank seized his property and sold it at an auction where it was bought for 415,000 euros (about $598,889) in early October. It explains why the owner never saw the property in advance, but he’s likely regretting that decision now.

Meanwhile, police are conducting an autopsy to determine a specific date of death. As for the unfortunate new owner, his properly value will likely drop since no one wants to live in a house that someone died in. There’s a negative stigma that you just can’t shake off and you’re better off demolishing and rebuilding the place.

You would think that disclosing a death in the property would be required, but in provinces other than Quebec, this isn’t the case. While real estate agents and sellers don’t have to tell a potential buyer this information, Ontario real estate agents are required to “discover and verify the pertinent facts relating to the property and the transaction” as a part of the rules by the Real Estate Council of Ontario, Toronto Star. It likely isn’t their fault that a death happened in their homes, but it seems wrong that they wouldn’t let potential buyers know all the information about a place.

There are a few court cases where a buyer purchased the property and discovered the house’s history later, neighbors do talk. If you want to avoid all this trouble, there’s a simple solution: do a quick Internet search before purchasing the property. You’ll likely conduct one to figure out about the crime rate or education in the area and this should be an extra precaution you should take to ensure your future property’s value. Once you’ve signed the dotted line, the place becomes yours and it’s your problem to deal with.

In the United States, DiedInHouse.com will tell you who died in your home, if anyone, for $11.99 U.S. While this service isn’t available in Canada, hopefully it’ll become available soon or real estate agents and sellers will be required to disclose this information.

Do you think sellers should be required to disclose a death that happened on the property?